First Time Volunteers: Meeting Florentin*

First Time Volunteers: Meeting Florentin*

Oltenia, Overcoming barriers, Romania, Support, Volunteer experience, Volunteering, Written by a previous volunteer

Stepping off the bus in Cezieni, you will always be greeted by two or three residents. They are so excited to see you, and to see what you’ve bought to play with. They’ll take your hand, they’ll make it clear what they want, they’ll know you’re there for them.

But what about the residents that don’t? The residents that keep to themselves, that don’t realise they deserve this attention too, that don’t know how to ask for it? This is the story of how I met one special resident, who proved that the little things like a smile or hug really matter, and can make such a difference to one person’s day.

On our first day in Cezieni I spotted this particular resident at lunchtime. He was trying to eat, but both his hands were shaking, and he didn’t have the confidence to sit down with the other residents. So, I gave him a hand. I think what struck me about him was how surprised he looked: he kept looking at me, then lowering his eyes, then looking back when he thought I wasn’t looking. It was such a stark contrast to the residents that had bounded up to us when we first got off the bus.

Later, I saw him wandering around the grounds. Someone saw me looking over, and told me that he never comes over to the volunteers. On a whim, I decided that if he wasn’t going to come to us, I was going to go to him! Over that day and the next, I went over to him every time he walked past our group. I would take his hands, make faces, smile. Slowly, he started to smile back, he started coming over more and more. At the end of the second day, he gave me a hug. I had lots of hugs in Slatina, but that was the most amazing, rewarding moment of my trip.

Cut to day three, and he is following me around, the biggest grin on his face. The carers start to notice, and they’re shocked: they’ve never seen him interacting like this. On day four, he met us off the bus. The man that I went over to meet because he didn’t usually interact with the other residents, joined us all for a game of pass the parcel.

This particular resident isn’t the only person that doesn’t approach the group of volunteers, so if you see someone in Cezieni that is keeping to themselves, don’t be afraid to go over. And if you see the resident this post is about, or even someone in a similar position to him, do what I did and give him a chance. You don’t know how much of a difference your quick smile and “buna” could make.

 

* The name in this blog has been changed in order to protect the identity of the adult we support.

Artice by
Sarah

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